Subscribe

Joint Activity Linked to Skin Severity in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis and Psoriasis

VBCR - December 2017, Vol 6, No 5 - AMCP News
Leslie Wyatt

Dallas, TX—It is necessary to consider skin efficacy in addition to joint efficacy when selecting treatment options for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who also have psoriasis, according to the results of a recent study that demonstrated a positive correlation between joint activity and skin severity.

Because the association between joint activity and skin severity is not well understood in this patient population, Talia Muram, MD, Senior Medical Advisor, Eli Lilly & Co, Indianapolis, IN, and colleagues assessed the relationship between the 2, and also sought to determine the effect that treatment for PsA has on skin severity and joint activity in patients with the disease who currently have, or have a history of, psoriasis. They reported their results in a poster presented at the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy Nexus 2017 Conference.

“Managing patients with PsA disease requires a greater understanding of how joints and skin respond differently to therapy. Control of both joint and skin symptoms are important for overall disease management of these patients,” Dr Muram and colleagues stated.

Using the Corrona registry, an independent cohort of patients with PsA or spondyloarthritis, Dr Muram and colleagues accessed the data of 647 adult patients enrolled between March 21, 2013, and September 30, 2016, who had a diagnosis of PsA with a current or previous diagnosis of psoriasis, and who had 12-month follow-up data.

Patients were categorized as having no change in therapy, or as having a reduction, addition, or switch in their therapy. Changes in joint activity and skin severity were determined by changes in category of body surface area (BSA; ie, low, mild, moderate, or high), Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI; ie, low, moderate, or high), or both.

At baseline, CDAI and BSA were moderate or high in 42.3% and 33.7% of all patients, respectively. In addition, patients who had high joint activity were more likely to have high skin severity (P = .014) than those with moderate or low joint activity. A total of 194 (30%) patients had improvement in skin severity, whereas 100 (15%) patients had worsening skin severity. A total of 135 (21%) patients had improvement in joint activity, whereas 113 (18%) patients had worsening joint activity. In 226 (35%) patients, no changes were seen in both joint activity and skin severity.

There were no changes in therapy seen in >50% of patients who had worsened or improved skin severity or joint activity. Among those who did have worsening skin severity and joint activity, 9 (40.1%) patients had no change in therapy or an increase in therapy.

Dr Muram and colleagues reported that after the 12-month mark, most patients had no change in therapy, and no changes in skin severity or joint activity.

“The positive association between joint activity and skin severity suggests treatment decisions for PsA patients with PsO [psoriasis] need to take into account both skin and joint efficacy. Further study beyond 12 months is needed to fully assess the real-world impact of these treatment interventions,” they concluded.

Related Items
Using Preference Phenotypes to Enhance Communication, Facilitate Treatment Decision-Making, and Personalize Care
Leslie Wyatt
VBCR - April 2018, Vol 7, No 1 published on April 17, 2018 in Rheumatoid Arthritis
Detecting Early Rapidly Progressing RA Is Feasible, and May Contribute to Reduced Healthcare Resource Use
Leslie Wyatt
VBCR - December 2017, Vol 6, No 5 published on December 19, 2017 in AMCP News
Use of Conventional Synthetic versus Biologic Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs May Reduce Costs in Treatment of RA
Leslie Wyatt
VBCR - December 2017, Vol 6, No 5 published on December 19, 2017 in Health Policy
Increased Risk for Bone Fracture Is Similar Among Men and Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis
Leslie Wyatt
VBCR - October 2017, Vol 6, No 4 published on October 20, 2017 in Rheumatic Diseases
Caffeine Consumption May Decrease Pain in Patients with Fibromyalgia Taking Opioids
Leslie Wyatt
VBCR - October 2017, Vol 6, No 4 published on October 20, 2017 in Fibromyalgia
Rheumatology Experts Hold Briefing to Educate Congressional Leaders on Arthritis and Its Effects
Leslie Wyatt
VBCR - April 2017, Vol 6, No 1 published on May 3, 2017 in ACR News
ACR and EULAR Develop Guidelines for Classifying Patients with Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome
Leslie Wyatt
VBCR - April 2017, Vol 6, No 1 published on May 3, 2017 in Sjögren’s syndrome
FDA Releases Draft Guidances on Sharing Healthcare Economic Information, Industry Communication Regulations
Leslie Wyatt
VBCR - April 2017, Vol 6, No 1 published on May 3, 2017 in FDA News & Updates
Patients with Gout and Poorly Controlled Comorbid Osteoarthritis Can Benefit from Earlier Treatment
Leslie Wyatt
VBCR - April 2017, Vol 6, No 1 published on May 3, 2017 in Gout
Physical Activity Reduces Symptoms of Depression in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis
Leslie Wyatt
VBCR - October 2016, Vol 5, No 5 published on November 2, 2016 in Health & Wellness
Last modified: January 8, 2018
  • American Health & Drug Benefits
  • Lynx CME
  • Value-Based Care in Myeloma
  • Value-Based Cancer Care
  • Value-Based Care in Rheumatology